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20131202
20131210
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't -- detroit is unstaphable because the people here cannot be stopped. the citizens of this city are the light at the end of the tunnel. the one man left standing. the underdog who actually wins. they are optimism, promise, potential, and hope. optimism is bringing this city back. this city is isn't afraid of opportunity. it's not discouraged by its past. it's excited about its future. i just loved the way she put that. a young woman who really believes and is optimistic about detroit. detroit's future and lisa's future will not come from washington. the magic of motown is here in the city. it's not in some central planner's notebook. what detroit needs to thrive is not washington'sdom nearing hand but freedom from big government's mastry. to thrive, detroit needs less government and more freedom, less red tape, less punitive taxes, more money left in detroit. the answer to poverty and unemployment is not another government stimulus. it's simply leaving more money in the hands of those who earned it. today i'm here to introduce something i call economic freedom zones. this is a bill that will
. there is the new york city systems that have been invested in infrastructure. health warning systems have done the same thing. we have also done retraining for the jobs of tomorrow. we have also done a whole bunch of work in terms of energy investments. there are a lot of things you can do with this patient capital in terms of helping readers in the infrastructure. >> we are going next to sean higgins. >> one of the issues that has up in the detroit bankruptcy issues is a collection that is valued in the billions. as an educator, do you support that? >> let me just say that the educators in the city have been under a different kind of emergency manager for a long time. the governor had the first emergency management statute, but it was done in a much more it was done of a lot of conversation back and forth in terms of the educators. frankly, our members in detroit have hugely sacrificed in the last two contracts in terms of taking pay cuts and other things amounting to four percent. -- 12%. the city school system is working with the educators now. there've been a lot of problems. this new emer
these kind of investments. we are halfway there. there is the new york city systems have invested in infrastructure. health warning systems have done the same thing. we have also done retraining for the jobs of tomorrow. we have also done a whole bunch of work in terms of energy investments. there are a lot of things you can do with this patient capital in terms of reinvesting in the infrastructure. >> we are going next to sean higgins. >> one of the issues that has up in the detroit bankruptcy issues is a collection that is valued in the billions. some people have suggested selling that off. as an educator, do you support that, or what are your thoughts on that? >> let me just say that the educators in the city have been under a different kind of emergency manager for a long time. the governor had the first emergency management statute, but it was done in a much more it was done of a lot of conversation back and forth in terms of the educators. frankly, our members in detroit have hugely sacrificed in the last two contracts in terms of taking pay cuts and other things amounting t
. this is a broad agenda, how we transform communities. it will touch everyone in this city. from the first time they go to school to becoming parents. economic freedom so that will remove government obstacles to success. it will provide a generation of citizens, students, workers with a new bargain, and the government will get out of the way. it will treat you like an adult. it will treat everyone equally under the law, it will help parents control their children's future and their education, it will help creators have more jobs for workers. it will treat you the same way everyone else, the matter the color of your skin, what part of town you comfort. we have tried the bailouts, excessive taxation. it has not worked. it does not work. we will try a new approach. you can meet your new challenges as you rebuild your cities, it will endure and prevail. i promise you that i will work you do we do that. thank you very much. [applause] >> it is my job to sort hundreds of questions and try to get them into some kind of order. i will start locally with a student question. what made you take interest in
in the economy have hurt all groups -- poor and middle class, inner city and rural folks, men and women, and americans of all races. and as a consequence, some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility that were once attributed to the urban poor -- that's a particular problem for the inner city -- single-parent households or drug abuse -- it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups -- these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are about anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with working-class parents are 10 times likelier than kids with middle- or upper-class parents to go through a time when their parents have no income. so the fact is this -- the opportunity gap in america is now as much about class as it is about race, and that gap is growing. so if we're going to take on growing inequali
. that is sunday on c-span. >> in a survey of major newspapers made in 1909, the kansas city star was rated more in favor of reform than all the other major metropolitan newspapers in the united states combined. as nelson himself told an interviewer in 1910, i do not want a star's editorial to be a lot of literary essays. i want to get things done. up historyowed teachers on past performance with an editorial in these are that rejected the notion that roosevelt was a man on horseback who would seize power and become dictator. he is a builder recall to his work said the paper, not a man on earth. after roosevelt hospital rival from africa, they talked about the candidates you -- candidacy. there were clubs formed. newspaperact of publisher william nelson on the american progressive movement and teddy roosevelt's campaign to win back the white house. colombian president juan manuel santos was in washington this week for talks with president obama. he spoke at the national press club about his country's free- trade agreement with the u.s., the war on drugs, and peace talks with colombian rebels. th
, 60 cities, counties, towns, and more coming every day, of parents, community groups, clergy, are union foundations talking about how to do bottom up reform, solution reform, community-based reform that actually helps kids be more successful than schools. so we are seeing this community work and this bottom-up organizing in public education, as well as in economic issues. job issues. >> mr. sellwood. >> you mentioned that we should not have a race to the bottom in this country. with what we saw in detroit, is does that raise the specter because other cities could resort to bankruptcy court to get out of pension promises they have made to workers? and secondly, how do you put this in a broader perhaps context of the fights that labor has fall in recent years with collective bargaining and pensions and perhaps the erosion of the social contract that other employees have enjoyed, which has been part of the deal for decades, and whether that is being unraveled? >> i think you are seeing ads and flows of this. in 2010, if you asked me that question, i would have quite a different
city, missouri on our lines for democrats. good morning. i am a liberal democrat from kansas city, missouri and i want to say a couple of things real quick. the media has gotten 80% of -- 40% of americans think he is a communist from kenya. and obama is a moderate republican. he is lower taxes for the very rich when they were supposed to be temporary. but because of clinton's surplus they have extended that. he got caught in an economic bind and he helped out the bankers. what he is doing with the insurance company are trying to do is trying to use free enterprise to regulate and turn the insurance companies who, by andway, are scam artists, turned them into a regulated utility and set some rules for the game and all the subsidies are going to the insurance companies. obviously, he's got to keep them from profiteering by putting a limit out so if they have a higher overhead than 20% they have to repay the money. well, we are trying to get people health insurance. and got thes in it pharmacy going and they put in the rule that the government can't negotiate pharmacy prices -- i go
to overcome. in this city today, what all of do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. your don't work with party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll finish by recounting words that lyndon johnson, a master legislator, said once. e grew up poor in the hill country in texas. and his family couldn't always were or granted that they going to have enough to keep the roof over their head or keep food on the table. is the thought i'll leave you with. jobson once said any man not willing to compromise, well, that man never went to bed hungry. know, he said any settle is not willing to for half a loaf, well, that man never went to bed hungry. that's exactly right. the american people expect us to be problem solvers and practical providers, not happen right now. we're too intent on taking an approach which leads to nothing. having said all of that, i'm pleased to be with you here
pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor relations regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. this would ensure any new facilities from this point forward would use modern technologies that are available to reduce carbon pollution. epa will also next june be proposing new standards that will also provide significant flexibility to the state that will effectively protect public health from carbon pollution from the existing power plants. that will be an opportunity to reduce the current levels of carbon pollution emitted by power plants and put us on a path for domestic energy, clean energy generation, and innovation. throug
for their kids? that's a great republican idea that you can take into the inner city. at you can take into the chamber of hispanics. you know, who should republicans favor? everybody. right. exactly. all right. thank you so guys so much. we sure appreciate it. and we thank you all for being here today. [applause] >> that was great. thank you so much. i appreciate it. >> later in the day former u.s. trade representatives will discuss the free trade agreement between the united states and the european union, the trance atlantic trade & investment partnership. you can watch the debate live at 6:00 p.m. eastern. lso on c-span 3. >> c-span, we bring public affairs events from washington directly to you, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, a offering complete, all as private service or pry videotape industry where c pan was funded by your local or sat lied provider and now you can watch us in h.d. >> next, social media and journal lism with ben splith. he delivered the keynote address at the journal lism conference in early october. and he took questions
billion -- $4 billion a year will have on the people who are in need in houston in particular, in my city in houston. the census report said over the last 12 months, 442,881 incomes were below the poverty level. 18% of households in the state of texas from 2009 through 2011 ranked second in the highest rate of food insecurity. so why can we not have an ag bill that would restore the $40 billion? why are we suggesting that those individuals are dead beats when one half of the persons on food stamps or snap are in fact children? that's something, mr. jeffries, that we can come together on and redo, or the conference could redo, that we could look to ensure that we are a place of laws, but a place of humanity. let me throw in two points that i consider are justice issues, the affordable care act, which is a justice initiative, which is to say, we all have access to good health care. we must change all of our attitudes, do a lot of things to make us healthy, but it is an intervenor and allows us to have preventive care and women not be considered as a pre-existing disease and allow children w
education, on december 9 there will be over 60 events, 60 cities, counties, towns, and more coming every day, of parents, community groups, clergy, our union foundations talking about how to do bottom up reform, solution reform, community-based reform that actually helps kids be more successful than schools. so we are seeing this community work and this bottom-up organizing in public education, as well as in economic issues. job issues. >> mr. sellwood. >> you mentioned that we should not have a race to the bottom in this country. with what we saw in detroit, is does that raise the specter because other cities could resort to bankruptcy court to get out of pension promises they have made to workers? and secondly, how do you put this in a broader perhaps context of the fights that labor has fall in recent years with collective bargaining and pensions and perhaps the erosion of the social contract that other employees have enjoyed, which has been part of the deal for decades, and whether that is being unraveled? >> i think you are seeing ebbs and flows of this. in 2010, if you asked me that qu
vital statistics about our speaker. she u.s.-born in new york city. she received her a.b. from princeton. she went to oxford where she was awarded a masters of philosophy. then a jd from harvard law school. after law school she clerked on the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit under justice marshall. she practiced for a while in washington d.c. and then became a law professor at the university of chicago. she went from there to serve in president clinton's administration in several roles and then she went back to teaching at harvard and was subsequently named as dean of harvard law school, first female dean of the law school there. in 2009, president obama nominated her for solicitor general of the united states and she served in that office for a year and was then nominated as an associate justice of the supreme court. she took that position in 2010 and filled the vacancy of justice john paul stevens who, after his retirement, was our last lecturer here at the law school. those are the vital statistics. i want to tell you something personal about her and i brought this
cities are picking up quickly, some aren't. keep are you going to looking for work or have you given up? caller: i will keep looking. fairs, i apply for work every day. i search for jobs every day, update my resume. i talk to all those people that i am supposed to talk to. i even tried to get back to school. it is difficult for some people. ,ost: three lines this morning for under 30, 31 to age 50, and 51 and over. our next caller -- caller: i spend a lot of time intel has see helping people for my business fraternity and different organizations looking for jobs, especially coming out of college or even if you are a currently in college. tallahassee is growing really quickly. we added a lot of different jobs here. -- ild say the only issue am definitely very optimistic about the job market. jobsnk there are a lot of out there, especially if you spend a lot of time looking at them and filtering through them. especially like the universities. i think the issue that we are having is so many of these jobs and 1010ng for five years experience or they will exchange out for education, for a co
thoughts of what is next. span, we are featuring the history and literary scene of the northern idaho city and on american history tv and booktv, 5:00 eastern time on c- span3, we will air our look at the area's connection to the area nation and its leader, richard butler, and how concerned citizens fought against the group. here is a preview. >> an aerospace engineer who retired in the mid-70's and moved with his wife betty and they bought property and he make the land and property a nonprofit church. that was basically the birth. 1981, they burned the first cross there on the property and started holding annual world congresses. >> richard butler was not a person that was dynamic and he was not a great speaker, but he was quite effective at publicity. lot ofas able to get a publicist he not only with the national media, but even at times international media. i think they were fascinated with the idea that he created these two organizations. it was somewhat unique in the sense that his political arm, which was neo-nazi are really not the nasty datsun -- doctrine, the political arm, and th
in kansas city star was rated more in favor of a reform than all the other major metropolitan newspapers in the united states combined. as nelson himself told an interviewer in 1910, i don't want the star's editorial to be a lot of literary essays, i want to get things done. nelson followed up his strictures on past performance with an editorial that reject the notion that roosevelt was a man on horseback who seized power to become dictator. he is a gold are recalled to his work, said the paper rather than a man on respect. after roosevelt's arrival from africa amid talk of his candidacy, there were clubs formed, back from elba clubs, like napoleon. >> the impact of william rockhill nelson on the american progressive movement and teddy roosevelt's campaign to win back that is latere today on american history tv. after the war, things escalate so quickly. a moment that seems so loving can just turn and flip and be so out of control. and it one of those days ended with adam packing to leave and him going to his things and seeing a hidden handgun. he says i want to take is to sell it becaus
city. a historical, cross-sectional study. we had data before labeling and after. what happened? nothing. nothing happened. mean calories did not change. they went up. three major changes showed very small decreases. 15% of the respondents reported using the caloric information, and those that did purchase 106 fewer calories than those that did not, but that is all most none of them, because when you go into a fast food restaurant, you were going for taste, and they say so. they may say they're going in for salad, but they buy the burger and fries. and there is a reason for that. children. 349 children and adolescents, most accompanied by their parents, and most from racial minority groups, no significant differences in calories purchased before after labeling. 35% ate fast food six or more times per week. 57% noted the labels. but only 9% reported using the information indeed. and 72% reported that taste was the most important factor. do you think that knowing what is in your food changes what you eat? not at all. so, education. how are we going to do that? which nutrients will
and that touched me being in the heart in the capital city of ohio. i'll be brief. the question is almost a follow-up to my colleague's question, but not as it relates to the church or faith-based. so often people in my district will say go to the church and they'll take care of it and that doesn't happen. when you need a loan in my district, the churches can't sustain new a home or with medical or groceries. if there was one thing you could say to us, i'm a so-what person and a resolve person. we're here and we heard you. what's the one extra thing you would like me to do, whether it's in my district or legislatively or here in a committee, what's the one thing? >> for me, and i've been asking myself what congress is doing and what they are doing for me as an individual and a community. i know you're not my representative. you do represent me in other ways. i think it's to find a way to resolve these issues that are facing our nation. help the people that are under yo your -- my husband and i were talking on the way to the airport that this is the congress that has done the least amount for the a
christine and them, as well. >> you will be pleased to know the city of madison just adopted an ordinance prohibiting discrimination against people simply because they are unemployed, joining a couple of other cities that have done so. congresswoman delauro is the author of that legislation in the house. it's interesting today is the day there will be strikes by fast food workers around the country. the reality is that wages have declined for workers in this country. note that a study we released earlier this year that looked at 700 some odd occupations and divided them into fifths. we found except for the highest-paid occupations there had been significant wage decline over the last three years. and the wage decline had been the greatest in the lowest-paid occupations. so there is no question, whatever the reason, whether it's intentional manipulation of wages, whether it's the law of supply and demand in a labor market in which there are way more job seekers than jobs, wages are going down for america's workers. that's why you see someone like lisa or vera or stan educated, experienced,
in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if anyone who ifointed the judge gave -- the judge gave any money to that person who a point to them, which is an interesting question. you would not be that in a state where there is an election system only. wortha asks for the net of the judges. they each other own particular brand of things. as our states to, they all have unique identities. host: do judges typically answer these types of questions openly? it is hard to know, but some film out with more diligence than others, some judges go above and beyond. they are not required to say how many shares they own in a stock in some judges did. some judges say i think this is important, i will put it out there, and just as war and silver in maine -- justice warren silver in maine was not required to disclose a much younger than a stock and he did. some judges went above and beyond. it's hard to know it's judges did not disclose e
.s.-born in new york city. she received her a.b. from princeton. she went to oxford where she was awarded a masters of philosophy. then a jd from harvard law school. on r law school she clerked the united states court of appeals for the d c circuit under justice marshall. she practiced for a while and washington d.c. and then became a law professor at the university of chicago. serve infrom there to president clinton's administration in several roles and then she went back to teaching at harvard and was subsequently named as dean of , first femalehool dean of the law school there. in 2000 nine, president obama nominated her for solicitor general of the united states and she served in that office for a asr and was then nominated an associate justice of the supreme court. 2010ook that position in of filled the vacancy justice john paul stevens who, after his retirement, was our last lecture here at the law school. those are the vital statistics. i want to tell you something personal about her and i brought this along so i could read it. this year in time, she was named as one of their most
difficulty finding a big-city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974-1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington dc, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, terrence thomas served in all three branches of government as a legislative aide to senator danforth, as chairman of the equal opportunity employment commission, and circuit judge on the united states court of appeals for the d c circuit. along the way, he met and married virginia, his oulmate. in 1991, he was appointed to this agreement court by president george h.w. bush. by this time, he had emerged as an outspoken conservative. so the confirmation process exacted a personal toll. by following the example of his grandfather, he persevered. and our nation is very fortunate that he did. on the court, justice thomas has been a steady and committed originalist, playing a pivotal role in the recovery and restoration of the original method of constituti
.t. department for the city. we had an i.t. department for the board of education. we had computers aging out before they were installed. effortsed to put the together and to work together, and we worked at technology integration. we lifted the education standards in a short amount of time. when i became mayor, if you talk about communities, the single largest investment almost every community across the country has has been in schools. it has a lot of stuff in the building, but if you scratch the realized thedid, i guy overseeing maintenance of buildings had a doctorate. there was not a single engineer who actually work for the system at that time. to find a way to save money in by plowing more into education, and we did that as well. >> let's open it up. be kind enough to identify your self by name and affiliation. 15 seconds and if i don't see your question i will move to someone else. >> i remember when you were mayor and we visited stanford. question goes back to the relationship between schools and general purpose. of the pioneers in pushing the kind of relationship you just discussed.
came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of government. as a legislative aide to senator danforth, as chairman of the equal opportunity employment commission, and as a circuit judge on the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit. along the way, he met and married virginia, his soulmate. [applause] in 1991, he was appointed to the supreme court by president george h.w. bush. by this time, he had emerged as an outspoken conservative, so the confirmation process exacted a personal toll. but by following the example of his grandfather, he persevered. and our nation is very fortunate that he did. on the court, justice thomas has been a steady and committed originalist, p
, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of government. as a legislative aide to senator danforth, as chairman of the equal opportunity employment commission, and as a circuit judge on the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit. along the way, he met and married virginia, his soulmate. [applause] in 1991, he was appointed to the and supreme court by president george h.w. bush. by this time, he had emerged as an outspoken conservative, so the confirmation process exacted a personal toll. but by following the example of his grandfather, he persevered. and our nation is very fortunate that he did. on the court, justice thomas has been a steady and committed originalist, playing a pivotal role in the recovery an
, and latinos. we need to fight to keep up our cities, like washington d.c., which is reduced thy most infections nearly by half. we are going to keep pursuing scientific breakthroughs. we are going to redirect $100 million into this project to develop a new generation of therapies. the united states should be at the forefront of new discoveries . or better yet, eliminate it completely. host: the end of the senate and specificallye -- looking at the status of the farm bill. the senators are confident the farm bill can pass by the end of the year. senior member of the negotiating group on the bill that says -- the house voted to cut almost $40 billion in funding over the same. -- over the same period. mike from virginia, thank you for holding on on our oppose line. you are on, sir. go ahead. oppose the drone delivery. , the corporation is ultimately responsible to its shareholders. they are clearly trying to save money. unfortunately, that wealth will to the folksbuted that work for the company. they cut folks and people women, with these sorts of ways to cut costs. i appreciate it is a
of principal on mortgages in areas hardest hit by foreclosures like detroit and cities like cleveland and toledo in ohio. j.p. morgan chase currently holds, get this, nearly a million mortgages. 208,000 mortgages considered seriously delinquent and in excess of 700,000 which are under water. that's too much power over our marketplace in too few hands. 500 million of the settlement will be credited for the removal of blight from neighborhoods through demolition reducing interest rates and offering new loans to low income borrowers. every community in america could use some of that. that's very little money for a very big hole. this setment may appear like a big step. it's a small step in the right direction. however let me put these figures on the record. last year j.p. morgan chase made $21.3 billion in profits. that doesn't count what's in their reserves. a settlement of $13 billion therefore is barely half of what j.p. morgan made in all of last year after expenses. in fact, this setment of $13 billion is equal to exactly half of what they had already setaside, $26 billion, for lega
vibrant men and women in the prime of their lives. spreading from city to city and country to country seemingly overnight. today, that picture has transformed. thanks to the courage and love of so many of you in this room and around the world. awareness has soared. research has surged. prevention, treatment, and care are now saving millions of lives. in some of the poorest countries as well. for many, with testing and ask us to the right treatment, the disease that was once a death sentence now comes with a good chance of a healthy and productive life. that is an extraordinary achievement. as president, i have told you that you will have a partner in me. if the united states wanted to be the global leader of combating this disease, we needed to act like it. by doing our part and leading the world. that is what we have done, in partnership with so many of you. we have created the first hiv aids strategy. accesserson should get to life extending care, regardless of age, gender, race, or ethnicity. support theinued to ryan white care act. entry ban sod the that people with hiv are no lon
and grief. for the last 10 years, mr. ferrari commuted six days a week into the city to his job s a building supervisor. he was a hardworking new yorker, totally devoted to his his friend and neighbor told me that he did everything for his family, and now his wife, who is still in shock and daughter, are trying to put all the pieces of their lives together. now congress must do its part to honor all the crash victims by advancing solutions that prevent tragedies like this one from ever happening again. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. mr. engel: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? mr. engel: i ask unanimous consent to address the house and to extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. engel: thank you, mr. speaker. this horrific tragedy, unfortunately, happened in my district about half a mile from where i live. when a tragedy like this happens, senseless tragedy, we as americans all pull together wherever tragedies occur and whether it's by -- ms. jackson lee: mr.
competent than many expect peter austin texas, like many other cities around the country, has a rapidly developing restaurant community. we, like most of the operators we know, participate in multiple restaurant entities with various partners, often with family members. the we consider each operation to be a small business the, each of us are discovering for the purpose of the health care law all of the businesses must be considered one employer due to the aggregation rule. this threatens to stop the development of restaurants in our community. theseplication of aggregation rules is already having an impact on small businesses, consuming valuable time and resources as businesses attempt to decipher their laws affect on them. most of the businesses have less than 50 full-time employees and would not be consider applicable large employers. large depending on the calendar month and whether our lips later is in perth -- is in session. based on my understanding of the aggregation rule, we will be considered one employer under the law that is applicable large employer. this is the cost of doi
struggle, but as the golden city of peace and unity embodied the aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. peace is possible because we have courageous leaders who have already taken significant political risks for peace. the time is approaching when they will have to take even more. they have shown real courage, both president abbas and prime minister netanyahu. president abbas has made tough choices. he has stayed the course, despite people in his team saying you ought to get out of here, look at those settlements, they are making a fool of you. believe me, that battle has been going on. i deal with it every week. at the same time, there has been israeli soldiers shot and killed in the west bank and other acts of incitement. prime minister netanyahu has made tough choices. just this week, he reaffirmed his commitment to a palestinian state. he said israel is ready for an historic peace. peace is possible today because the arab league has also made tough choices. for the first time, they came to washington. they met with me. they came out and announced that the new map will look d
trying to make it fair to those people who serve a short time. host: in salt lake city, utah. michael is on the line for democrats. caller: hello. ask if there's about the people who and can apply for social security benefits like everybody else. i don't know about that. there have been extreme cases where there was severe physical disability. to your point about social .ecurity, yes they can claim social security, but only after they reach the age of 65. you can have a guy who analyst in the navy at the age of 18. he serves 20 years. he is out of the navy before he has 40 years old. he is going to get some sort of retirement benefit immediately. and then he is probably going to live, based on the average life expectancy, another 30 or 40 years. we pay people for 60 years to serve only 20. that is probably one of the sensitive things on the table, in terms of whether that is really the best way to do things, in terms of providing that paycheck immediately upon retirement. let's go to fred in new york. caller: thank you. hello? is, is there any reason why we can't bring back the draft
here. you need to go to school. i had not applied to any of the city schools in new york. i went back to my high school, they couldn't do much for me other than direct me to the state university of new york office in manhattan. i went there and with my transcript in hand, sat there with a woman who i will never forget. she made a phone call to almost every single one of the suny schools. school was about to start in a couple of weeks. she pitched my application to a number of the schools, the big university schools like binghamton and so forth. none of them had room. they simply were filled to capacity. the two schools that did have a place for me were suny purchase and the other one was suny college at plattsburgh. i looked on a map and the map burgh was up by the canadian border. it look far away from home so i chose that one. >> where did you get your medical degree? downstate. >> when did you join the navy? are you still in the navy? >> are you in the navy full-time ? >> yes. >> howdy do the navy full-time and the private hospital? >> we have a memorandum of understanding joined t
a university and a mother who told can't stay here. you need to go to school. to any of ot applied the city schools in new york, good.gh they were all didn't apply to the suni schools either. >> state university of new york? >> correct. they could do was connect university of new york office. i sat there with my transcript woman who with a made a phone call to every single one of the suni schools july.e school was starting in a couple of weeks. application to the big university school bing ham tons e and albany. none had room. filled to capacity. the two schools that had a place purchase, state university of new york in purchase and the other one was university of new york college at plattsburgh. looked on a map and the map showed that plattsburgh was up border.canadian and it looked so far from home, i said i'll choose that. purchase looks too close. where did you get your medical degree? downstate. >> when did you join the navy? >> after medical school. >> what year? 1998. >> are you still in the navy? >> yes. >> navy full time? yes. >> how do you do navy full time private hospital fairf
, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom tailoring and innovated the retail industry by creating the man's off-the-rack suit. at the end of the civil war, john simmons had become the largest clothing manufacturer in the united states. at the time of his death in 1870, his will records his intention for his great wealth. to found and endow an institution to be called simmons female college for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, best calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent livelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were subject, john simmons has enabled generations of women to lead and self advocate, empowered with their own resources. those of us who have delighted so enormously from john simmons's philanthropy are delighted to be with you to witness the work of our founders contemporary, angelina grimke. we hope you enjoy the even
take to the inner city, that you can take into the hispanics, that you can take to lower and middle voters. who's the favor? everybody. so much.you guys, we appreciate it, thank you all for being here today. >> tomorrow connecticut governor will speak in washington, d.c. about some of the issues his state is focused on, in particular, education. be speaking at the american enterprise institute p.m. eastern on c-span 2. 1974, vice t 9, president ford was sworn in as president of the united states. mrs. forde dress that was wearing at the swearing in ceremony in the east room of the house. she was less than excited about becoming first lady. but president ford encouraged her, saying we can do this. he resolved if i'm going to have do this, i'm going to have fun doing it. for her started immediately. within ten days, she had a state king husseinertain of jordan. it was something she had to prepare for as her role as first lady and she hit the ground running. >> first lady, betty ford, eastern, live9:00 on c-span and c-span 3, also on radio and c-span.org. >> late last month, "the wall
is at stake here city -- is the cup has capacity for you or your to have thebe able security of decent health insurance at a reasonable cost through choice and competition on this marketplace and tax credits that you may be eligible for that can save you hundreds of dollars in premium costs month potentially. to -- now that we are getting the technology fixed ande need you to go back take a look at what is actually going on. it can make a difference in your lives and the lives of your families. the president yesterday as onlaunches the second act healthcare.gov, encouraging people to go to the website and try again. the washington times this -- the president leader and chief on obamacare. -- salesman -- cheerleader in chief for obamacare. democrats and the president are expected to have a coordinated effort in pushing healthcare.gov. --e is a congressman's tweet what do you think about the rollout of healthcare.gov enter the president fire somebody? betty in albuquerque, new mexico. democrat. thank you for accepting my call. this particular congress that we now -- i believe the th -- hasnd 12
the canadian border. the city is probably best known for the beauty. kinds ofmidst all water, lakes, and rivers. we live in the mountains. all kinds of color. to me, the story is that we have become what we needed to become. we are a city that we have thrived on mining and timber. as that one away, so did many of our jobs. hard at will are we going to be? we do not want to lose that sense of who we were as far as people and a community. we had to look at what the jobs were going to being. we are known for the tour is on we have a -- we are known for the tour is him. we have a huge medical center. we are trying to diversify the economic base. we realize as a city, if we are not growing, it does not mean we but we have hugely, to be progressive and in the real world. at the same time, we what to hang on to the people here. i have hopes for the immunity. i do not see our culture go away. -- going away. >> "washington journal " continues. this morning on c-span's washington journal, we want to focus on the work of nih. we want to give you the opportunity to learn more about the people behind the ag
in the bustling gold-rush city of johannesburg. by then, africans were prevented from walking on the pavements -- they had to walk on the streets they had to carry passes to work in the city, they could not use buses and trains designated for whites, they were dreadfully exploited in the mines, and they had no political rights. we all say in britain that we were against apartheid, and doubtless we were, but some did things about it. others did not. the anti-apartheid struggle was for most of its life engaged in a big fight, here in britain, too. the executive secretaries of the anti-apartheid movement -- first, ethel de keyser, then mike terry -- were indefatigable. its chairman, lord bob hughes, and treasurer, richard caborn -- former members of this house -- were real stalwarts, along with neil kinnock and glenys as well. protests to stop whites-only springbok tours provoked fierce anger. [laughter] i remember it them well -- "hain the pain," as i recall. some people might still feel that. yet, as nelson mandela confirmed to me, the springboks' sporting isolation was a key factor in making w
point. the decades' long shift in the economy have hurt all groups, poor and middle class, inner city and rural folks, men and women. and americans of all races. and as a consequence, some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility that were once attributed to the urban poor -- that's a particular problem for the inner city. single parent households or drug abuse or -- it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups, these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are about anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with working class parents are 10 times likelier than are more likely to -- the fact is this, the opportunity gap in america is now as much about class as it is about race and that gap is growing. so if we're going to take on growing inequality and try to improve upward mobility for all peopl
was a convoy driver, 350 missions. i drove humvees, even iraqi city bus in downtown bag that and provided all that information in my case. pictures taken by combat drivers of me driving. they still denied me over and over and over again. i have ptsd. for a variety of reasons. when i filed the claim, they denied me right away immediately. they said, you don't have it. our evaluator said he must have had a bad childhood. no, actually i didn't. my childhood wasn't terrible. it wasn't great. i was a kid, but it had to do with the issues that have been over there. i was being treated by their own psychiatrist or psychologist for for years that i etf e. yet they still denied me. does that answer your question, congressman? thank you very much. >> i know my time has expired. but we have another round? i know you have three. can i have one more question? stating from 2009 the average number of issues come including a disability claim increased from two-point name for 4.9 in the va is the shooting lanes as in organizational structure to process complex claims. three or more medical issues that did not
into it. he spent time on it. alas events of the campaign was in new york city. it was in a heavily hispanic area. bakeryat every hispanic in the state of new jersey. he made it a priority. it was a priority from day one. when he brings to the table is the fact that he can get, that he can increase the base. that he can get crossover voters. he needed to prove that he did. he made it a priority. the romney did not. do not blame hispanics. question, final question, would be that tonight you've talked a lot about what the republican party needs. you are saying that white men are not with they used to be. you touched on chris christie and what he did to appeal to the republican party and the hispanic vote. think, in your opinion, could be the candidate to aing everyone back republican party in the white house. >> i'm jaded and biased. he is my friend. i know him. i love him. he speaks beautiful spanish. i think the best candidate in the field is jeb bush. i think -- a sickly this election cycle, i am like a plus size men's store. i'd either go in big or tall. if the tall guy does not t
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